#BookReview: Defenseless Christianity by Gerald J. Mast

Made many great assertions. With little evidence to back any of them up. Suffers from the same problem of many in academia in that it dramatically widens the scope of what it calls “violence” to include many scores of topics that are not actually violent, and many of which demonstrably do not exist, at least not in the ways their proponents argue. But very well written, despite its problems in certain particular topics.

This review of Defenseless Christianity by Gerald J. Mast and J. Denny Weaver was originally published on January 8, 2018.

#BookReview: We Are The Danger by Sean Edwards

Presented a lot of arguments, but little evidence to back them up. I could very likely write a more detailed presentation of similar arguments with the facts to back them up myself – I’ve largely *been* doing that on social media for years. Still, a good read if you’ve never considered the topic. But in this day and age, who hasn’t?

This review of We Are The Danger by Sean Edwards was originally published on January 6, 2018.

#BookReview: On Liberty by John Stuart Mill

This was the book where I learned a very critical piece of my reading personality:

I much prefer my philosophy tomes in novel form to essay.

This was such a difficult read only because I could not “watch the movie in my head” as I do with even most nonfiction. On the whole, it was an intriguing look into his philosophy of Utilitarianism, specifically as it relates to liberty. More people would do well to read this and understand its arguments, particularly when discussing political issues even 15o years later.

This review of On Liberty by John Stuart Mill was originally published on January 3, 2018.

#BookReview: Civil Disobedience by Henry David Thoreau

Wow. To those who think that the rise of the anarchists/ minarchists is a new phenomenon, I present… Civil Disobedience. Wherein you read – nearly 170 years ago – most every argument I have heard any anarchist put forward regarding what is right to do where government is concerned. Relatively short at just 33 pages long, a quick but very good read, particularly the front half.

This review of Civil Disobedience by Henry David Thoreau was originally published on January 1, 2018.

#BookReview: Forbidden Island by Jeremy Robinson

North Sentinel Island. A place few have heard of, but those who have wonder about. The place of the last remaining known yet uncontacted by modern society people on the planet.

And the setting for Jeremy Robinson’s tale of the FORBIDDEN ISLAND. Here, Robinson takes the known – that these people appear to live as man did millenia ago, without even metal weaponry – and spins another great monster story. One that returns to his early style of writing to craft yet another excellent tale. Go into this expecting the unexpected, and let Robinson wow you yet again.

This review of Forbidden Island by Jeremy Robinson was originally published on December 5, 2017.

#BookReview: Viking Tomorrow by Jeremy Robinson

Imagine the most bad ass female fighter you can possibly imagine. Now put her as the leader of a rag tag bunch of post apocalyptic warriors on a Lord of the Rings style journey to save the world. Combine that with Jeremy Robinson’s mastery of creature based action novels, and you get… one of the most kick ass books I’ve read at least this year, and possibly in several years or even ever. Wild, fun ride. Can’t wait to see where he takes this tale!

This review of Viking Tomorrow by Jeremy Robinson and Kane Gilmour was originally published on October 24, 2017.