#BookReview: Made in New York by Ana Newfolk

Solid Introduction. Isaac and Max meet by accident and emergency at a conference. Over the next 36 hours or so, they manage to connect and fall in love. But what happens next? Well, we’re going to have to find out in the next (full length) book, as this short story was just meant to serve as our introduction to them and to allow them to rapidly fall in love at first sight. Which it did superbly. This book has a little bit of everything in its short length. Action (trapped in a fire!), drama (who is this other guy he is mentioning?), fun and flirting, hot sex, deep emotions. Newfolk truly manages to capture a bit of everything, and do it very well. By the end of this book you’ll be hoping you have the next one handy, and fortunately I do. So here I go!

This review of Made in New York by Ana Newfolk was originally published on January 17, 2019.

#BookReview: The Ultimate Guide for the Avid Indoorsman by John Driver

ducational and Informative. This book is full of tips and tricks for the Indoorsman that are both hilarious and, in fact, educational. Which is which? Test them and find out. 😀 Overall, a truly laugh out loud book that also made great, perfectly valid, points in nearly equal measure. Very highly recommended reading, particularly as you look to set or maintain your resolutions for the new year.

This review of The Ultimate Guide for the Avid Indoorsman by John Driver was originally published on January 10, 2019.

#BookReview: The Three Secret Cities by Matthew Reilly

Yet Another Wild Ride! At this point, if you’re following these books you’re going to keep reading them. If you haven’t picked them up yet, go back to 7 Deadly Wonders and start the series from there – there is *so* much to get caught up on before picking this book up. (Though in fairness, you can largely follow this particular book just from reading 4 Legendary Kingdoms first.) HOWEVER, that “shocking ending”… wasn’t, at least not for me. Until the final few words. And *now* I am intrigued and looking forward to the 2 ____ _____ with baited breath!

This review of The Three Secret Cities by Matthew Reilly was originally published on January 6, 2019.

#BookReview: The Memory of You by Jamie Beck

Excellent Memory. This was an excellent book, and a great introduction to a new trilogy from Beck. Longtime fans of hers will likely enjoy it, and newcomers will have an excellent introduction into her style of writing and storytelling. As far as this particular story itself goes, it was engaging and interesting, and never really felt as long as it actually is. (Though don’t let the actual page count fool you, there are author notes at beginning and end, plus a sources section and the almost requisite sample of book 2 – actual length of the edition I read was 4% shorter than the total length of the book.)

This review of The Memory of You by Jamie Beck was originally published on December 29, 2018.

#BookReview: In Defense of Food by Michael Pollan

Enlightening. This book makes its case well, and taught me much I genuinely didn’t know. Very intriguing read, and one I’ll likely use as a general guide to healthier eating. No matter what you think about food or weight loss or anything related to the very basic act of eating and the more elaborate structures of cuisine, this book should teach you something and/ or challenge any beliefs you may already have.

This review of In Defense of Food by Michael Pollan was originally published on December 26, 2018.

#BookReview: The Perfect Score by Maggie Dallen

Great Ending. In the conclusion to this trilogy, we finally get the story of the most outspoken girl of the group paired with… the most silent guy of the group. As was the case throughout this series, some great laughs, some biting heartache, some miscommunications common around the HS age, and very little actual sports play. (Indeed, there is no scoring of any kind specifically mentioned – much less shown – in this particular tale.) Very fun and fast read, highly recommended.

This review of The Perfect Score by Maggie Dallen was originally published on December 19, 2018.

#BookReview: Undiluted by Benjamin L. Corey

Solid Effort. In this book, Corey puts forth a clear message that no matter what you think of Jesus, you are more than likely wrong in at least some aspect. He challenges very nearly every reader on at least some issue, and in that vein he truly shines. But in the end, he just can’t quite fully overcome his own particular bent, and ultimately this mars what could have been a truly stellar work. Still a worthy read, but could have been even better.

This review of Undiluted by Benjamin L. Corey was originally published on December 12, 2018.

#BookReview: The Christmas Lights Battle by Skylar M. Cates

The Battle That Never Was. This is a M/M romance that works well. Both men have their own unique histories that make getting together complicated, but it seems that these complications are resolved way too quickly. As is the “battle” that is so central to the premise that it is the title of the book. But the romance itself flows well, and the sex is absolutely NC-17 and fairly plentiful. Solid book, and looking forward to more from this new-to-me author.

This review of The Christmas Lights Battle by Skylar M. Cates was originally published on December 8, 2018.

#BookReview: Alter by Jeremy Robinson

The Master Made Me Cry! In this latest book from the Modern Day Master of Science Fiction, Robinson yet again does something he has never done before – he left me in tears at the end of a tale. In yet another foray into gut punching emotional drama (while still keeping the pulse pounding science fiction that is his bread and butter), Robinson outdoes himself again in exploring just how much a man will lose in order to survive – and whether or not the man can ever revert fully to what he was before the change. Simply amazing.

This review of Alter by Jeremy Robinson was originally published on December 3, 2018.

#BookReview: Disarming Scripture by Derek Flood

Solid Trajectory, But Not Far Enough. I’m not completely sold that the “trajectory” reading of the Bible Flood bases his premise on is entirely correct, but for now let’s go with it. Flood raises a lot of good points that will, as the title implies, “step on toes” across “both” sides of the American political divide. But there are certainly times where he contradicts himself and others where he reveals his own cloudy understanding of violence, choosing to view violence only as genocide, murder, explicit assault, and the like. But in the end, Flood doesn’t go quite far enough in his own line of reasoning and instead tends to embrace certain forms of “acceptable” violence, in ways reminiscent of the very blatantly antiquated notions he is attacking in this book. Absolutely recommended for those that either openly embrace the wanton slaughter of the Old Testament or those that fully reject it, as this will at least open you to the basic concepts of nonviolence.

This review of Disarming Scripture by Derek Flood was originally published on November 23, 2018.